The Olympics wasn't always the greatest at marketing itself. Michael Payne, the IOC's first marketing director, joins us to about how he helped the organization develop programs that have become integral at helping the organization thrive.

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As is our tradition, we're dedicating our first episode of the year to the Games that will be the focus of our history moments in 2023. You have selected Seoul 1988, so we are really excited to dig into these Games. To kick things off, we've got Olympic historian Bill Mallon to share some of the background, big moments, and legacies of these Games.

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Sports marketing, sponsorship and bid city consultant Terrence Burns is back for part two of our conversation. This time we're talking bidding for the Olympics. Which bids surprised everyone? Which bids failed miserably? We've got the details!

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What's it like to be an Olympic sponsor, and how has sponsorship and marketing of the Olympics evolved? Terrence Burns is here to give some insight into this history.

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It is two years to go until the Paris 2024 Olympics begin! To celebrate, we're talking with George Hirthler, author of The Idealist, a historical novel about this founder of the modern Olympic Movement. We talk with George about the baron's life and his thoughts on physical education within the French school system, along with his struggles to have it implemented. We also discuss his attitude toward amateurism and whether women should participate in the Games (Pierre's philosophy might surprise you).

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Author David Davis returns to the show to talk about his book and the upcoming documentary Waterman: The Life and Times of Duke Kahanamoku, about the legendary 3x Olympic medalist and surfing pioneer.

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It's the end of the year, which means it's the end of our year-long look back at the Atlanta 1996 Olympics and Paralympics. We discuss their favorite Atlanta stories from the year, and we also have lightning rounds from some TKFLASTANIS with Atlanta 1996 connections: City planners Michael Dobbins and Randal Roark, and softball player Laura Berg,

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We love a good telenovela-esque Olympic situation, and this week's episode is chock full of them. Bribery! Guilty verdicts! Stifling voices! Boring kits! Transgender guidelines! And someone makes Alison mad - who could it be this week?

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Women's gymnastics is one of the most popular Olympic events, but the way the sport evolved made it ripe for abuse and overtraining. Sports scholar and former international gymnast Georgia Cervin joins us to talk about her book, "Degrees of Difficulty: How Women’s Gymnastics Rose to Prominence and Fell From Grace" Just how did such a popular sport become such a welcome environment for abuse, and can today's gymnastic stars change their sport for the better?

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Today’s guest is author and historian Dr. Cat Ariail. Cat is a lecturer of history at Middle Tennessee State University and author of the new book Passing the Baton: Black Women Track Stars and American Identity. We discuss how great female Olympic track athletes Alice Coachman, Mae Faggs, Wyomia Tius, Wilma Rudolph, Willye White, Earlene Brown changed the way society perceived Black women in the sporting world.

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This week we're kicking off our year of looking back at Atlanta 1996. Sarah Dylla is an Exhibition Curator at the Atlanta History Center, and she’s curated the museum’s new exhibit on the Atlanta Games called Atlanta ‘96: Shaping an Olympic and Paralympic City. We talked with Sarah about the exhibit, how the Games got to Atlanta and how they affected the city….and yes, we’ve got Izzy talk too.

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This weekend marks the 40th anniversary of the Moscow 1980 Olympics, which may be better known for the 66-country boycott of them. Our TKFLASTANI archivist Teri Hedgpeth joins us to talk about the boycott and a new exhibit she put together for the US Olympic and Paralympic Committee that honors the US athletes who were affected by it.

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In world current events, protests against racial injustice have been taking place all over the world. That prompted us to look at the history of protests at the Olympics and the ongoing discussions over the International Olympic Committee's Rule 50.

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The Olympics used to be a showcase for amateurism, but over time they've grown more and more commercialized. Authors Stephen R. Wenn and Robert K. Barney join us to talk about their new book The Gold in the Rings: The People and Events that Transformed the Gamesand the key people throughout Olympic history who made an impact on its trajectory. Yep, that includes some Avery Brundage talk!

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