Dr. Victoria Jackson, a lecturer at the School of Historical, Philosophical, and Religious Studies at Arizona State University joins us to talk about the Caster Semenya case and other ways gender and sex have been discriminated against throughout Olympic history.

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Today we're talking about New Zealand and what participating in the Olympics means for its national identity. Our guest is Dr. Micheal Warren, an adjunct research fellow at Victoria University of Wellington in New Zealand. We talk with Micheal about New Zealand's place in Olympic history--and it has a pretty prominent one for being a small country--how the stance "politics and sport don't mix" changes at one's convenience, and how a "disastrous" Olympic performance has changed the way the government funds athletes.

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In this episode we're joined by Martin Atock, Managing Director at Peden Bloodstock, the firm that's been transporting horses to the Olympics since Montreal 1976. Martin tells us the incredible amount of logistical work that's involved and what it's like for a horse to fly on an airplane.

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The US Olympic Committee's training facility in Colorado Springs plays hosts to hundreds of athletes every year. Some spend a week or two on campus for special training; others live there year round. To make sure the athletes are getting everything they need, the USOC relies on Sherry Von Riesen, athlete services coordinator -- or better known as Team Mom. In honor of Mother's Day this weekend, we learn more about how she helps the athletes become their best.

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It's time for another Book Club episode, which means a great conversation with our friend Book Club Claire! Today we're talking about "The Second Mark: Courage, Corruption, and the Battle for Olympic Gold" by Joy Goodwin. This book documents the judging scandal around the 2002 Olympic pairs figure skating competition, which resulted in a whole new system of judging.

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